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A typical break-up process of a propane liquid bridge in vacuum at 185 K, recorded in a MD simulation, at t= 0 (a), 200 (b), 400 (c), and 547 ps (d). The break-up profile is shown in (d), exhibiting a geometry of two cones joined at the apex and pinching in the middle. The length of the nanobridge is 30 nm, and its initial average radius is 3 nm. Note also some evaporation of the bridge molecules.
  
From:
Research: Fluid Dynamics Works on Nanoscale in Real World
Posted Thu April 19, 2007 @09:16AM
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News In 2000, Georgia Tech researchers showed that fluid dynamics theory could be modified to work on the nanoscale, albeit in a vacuum. Now, seven years later they've shown that it can be modified to work in the real world, too that is, outside of a vacuum. The results appear in the February 9 issue of Physical Review Letters (PRL).

Understanding the motion of fluids is the basis for a tremendous amount of engineering and technology in contemporary life. Planes fly and ships sail because scientists understand the rules of how fluids like water and air behave under varying conditions.

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